Stewarding Life's Essentials, Nurturing Life's Potential

Board of Trustees

Ellen Condliffe Lagemann

President

Ellen is the Levy Institute Research Professor at Bard College, a Senior Scholar at the Levy Institute, and a Distinguished Fellow at the Bard Prison Initiative. She previously served as Charles Warren Professor of the History of American Education at Harvard University, where she was also Dean of the Graduate School of Education, and as president of the Spencer Foundation, in Chicago, Illinois. In addition, Lagemann has been a professor of history and education at New York University, where she was founding chair of the Department of the Humanities and the Social Sciences and director of the Center for the Study of American Culture and Education in the School of Education. Before that she served on the faculty at Teachers College, Columbia University, where she was also Director of the Institute of Philosophy and Politics of Education and Editor of the Teachers College Record and a member of the faculty of the Columbia University (Faculty of Arts & Sciences) History Department.

Lagemann is the author or editor of many books, articles, reviews, and book chapters. Her principal publications include: An Elusive Science: The Troubling History of Education Research (2000); Philanthropic Foundations: New Scholarship, New Possibilities (1998); The Politics of Knowledge: The Carnegie Corporation, Philanthropy, and Public Policy (1992); Jane Addams on Education (1985) and A Generation of Women: Education in the Lives of Progressive Reformers (1979).  Her most recent book (edited with Harry Lewis) is What is College For? The Public Purpose of Higher Education (2011).

Lagemann has been president of the National Academy of Education and of the History of Education Society.  She chaired the National Research Council’s Committee on Teacher Preparation, whose report, Preparing Teachers: Building Evidence for Sound Policy, was published in 2010, and was a member of the Teaching Commission, chaired by Louis Gerstner. She has been a trustee of the Russell Sage, Greenwall, and Markle Foundations; vice-chair of the board of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral and Social Sciences in Stanford, California; and chair of the Social Science Committee on Philanthropy and the Non-Profit Sector. She also served on the boards of the Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy and of the District Management Council, both in Cambridge, MA.

Lagemann is a former high-school social studies teacher.  She received her A.B. from Smith College in 1967 and her Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1978.

Tim Paholak

Vice-President

Tim has worked at Triform since 1996 where he currently serves as President in addition to being a House Parent and director of Student Admissions. He was first introduced to Waldorf while pursuing a Masters program in Elementary Education at Michigan State. Since 1975, Tim has been involved in various Camphill initiatives. He ran the woodshop and pottery studio at Beaver Run before going on to manage the orchard and CSA at Camphill Soltane. Tim has lived and worked in our community caring for those with special needs for 36 years. Tim is the father of two Hawthorne Valley alumni.

Elaine Khosrova

Secretary

Elaine is the founding editor-in-chief of culture, a quarterly national consumer magazine and website dedicated to covering the origins and producers of specialty cheese and dairy. She has been a staff editor and food writer for Country Living, Fine Cooking, Yankee, Self, Plate, Santé, and many other publications. Elaine is also the winner of a 2007 Gold Folio publishing award and has served as a James Beard Journalism Award judge. A former pastry chef who trained at the Culinary Institute of America and La Varenne in Paris, Elaine has an undergraduate degree in food and nutrition. Living in Chatham, New York, she and her husband, Mitchell, are parent alumni of Hawthorne Valley School; their son, Alex, graduated with the class of 2005 and their daughter, Luca Pearl, graduated in 2012.

Tom James

Treasurer

Thomas James became Provost, Dean of the College, and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Teachers College, Columbia University on July 1, 2007, and is also Professor of History and Education in TC’s Department of Arts and Humanities. Tom was formerly Dean of the School of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Previously, he was Vice Dean and Professor of Educational History at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Education, and prior to that, a tenured professor at Brown University. He received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University and his master’s and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University. A historian by training, he is the author of Exile Within: The Schooling of Japanese Americans 1942–45.

He also has written on law and the history of education, educational governance and control, and experiential education. As a child, Tom attended the Laboratory School at the University of Chicago, founded by John Dewey.

Mary Cleaver

Mary is one of the country’s foremost authorities on sustainable food and local sourcing, and is the founder and owner of The Cleaver Co. and The Green Table.

In addition to Mary’s reputation for providing sumptuous, seasonally-driven food, attentive service and excellent event planning, she is well known for helping create a sustainable, humane and delicious food system. The Cleaver Co. and The Green Table are widely recognized for utilizing local farms and purveyors in order to obtain the best- quality product, and for supporting small to mid-size farms and family farmers.

In November 2011, Mary was named the first-ever “Snailblazer” by Slow Food NYC to honor her contributions creating a better, healthier food system for all. She is a founder of the Farm to Chef network and a board member of Food Systems Network NYC and Local Infrastructure for Local Agriculture, among other professional affiliations.

Before founding The Cleaver Co., she was a corporate chef at G.A.F. Corporation, the pastry chef at J.S. Vandam, a food stylist, and a cooking teacher at The New School. Mary co-authored The TriBeCa Cookbook, published by Ten Speed Press in 1995, and is a graduate of Bennington College. She lives in Brooklyn with her family..

Bob Fox

Bob Fox is one of New York’s most respected architects and sustainability leaders, and is a foremost authority on green buildings. Bob’s distinguished career includes numerous honors for leadership and sustainable design, establishing him as an influential voice in the architectural profession, the business community, and in service to the public sector.

Having completed 4 Times Square, which set new standards for energy efficient high-rise buildings, Bob joined with Richard Cook in 2003 to form COOKFOX Architects and led the design of the LEED Platinum Bank of America Tower at One Bryant Park, a 2.2 million square-foot building. COOKFOX has received many honors, including AIA-NY Housing Design awards for Historic Front Street and The Hegeman, a supportive housing development.

Bob and Rick Cook joined Bill Browning and Chris Garvin in 2006 to form Terrapin Bright Green, a sustainability consultancy to address a broad spectrum of planning and policy projects. Terrapin has produced an ongoing series of publications addressing sustainability in the built environment, including 14 Patterns of Biophilic Design and Tapping into Nature.

In 2006, Bob was named as the only architect to serve on Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Advisory Council for the Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability. Bob is the founding chairman of Urban Green Council, and he has received the U.S. Green Building Council’s highest honor, the Leadership Award for service to the green building community.

Bob serves on the Advisory Board for the Center for Health and the Global Environment at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is a member of the prestigious “Green Dream Team” for Interface Corporation and is a member of the U.S. General Services Administration Green Building Advisory Committee. He has served as a Board member for De La Salle Academy since 1995.

Bob Fox is a graduate of Cornell University and Harvard University. He and his wife Gloria live in Manhattan and the Hudson River Valley.

Sarah Henry Lederman

Sarah taught history and was the chair of the high school history department at the Dalton School in New York City from 2002-2012. She holds a Ph.D. in American history from Columbia University (1994), and she completed the Farm School’s “learn-to-farm” program in 2013.

Martin Ping

ex-officio

To read Martin’s biography, please see Hawthorne Valley’s staff page.

Laurie Sackler

Laurie is a pure food and clean water advocate/activist with a lifelong interest in landscape and ecology.Her undergraduate Fine Arts degree was in Theater, and she worked in theater management at City Center of Music and Drama, NYC and Brooklyn Academy of Music.

She has an MA in the Literature and Religion of the Bible, conferred jointly by Columbia University and Union Theological Seminary.  The topic of her master’s thesis was “A Biblical Ethic of Ecology.” She taught Biblical Studies at New York Theological Seminary for ten years. Laurie also has an MA from Columbia University in the Art and Archaeology of the Ancient Near East.

Laurie served on the Advisory Board of Grace Church School in Brooklyn Heights for ten years, three of those years as Board President. She also served as a Trustee of Saint Ann’s School in Brooklyn Heights for ten years. She currently serves as a trustee of several family foundations and is a member of the Council for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum.

She and her husband, Arthur, have four children and live in Brooklyn Heights and Bedford, New York. Laurie is an avid home cook and is particularly interested in fermentation. She makes a stellar kimchi, as well as krauts and yogurts and she maintains a biodynamic home garden.